2020 08 20: Kids

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This story is timed to the following song for almost all readers. Please play the song and read along with the lyrics.

I laid on my bed, staring up at the ceiling.

I listened to the sounds of kids playing in the background, and the inaccurate upbeat tune fade in.

I felt what could be best described as panic, the predecessor to fear.

The fear of nostalgia.

The melody started playing. I felt as if this was somehow more accurate to what I knew the song was going to be about, even though I knew it wasn't, and I had listened to this song almost a hundred times.

I tried to relax.

Kids are sad, the sky is blue
There are monsters in the spare bedroom
Kids grow up, and move away
They closed the plant and the mall arcade
Kids are sad, their parents, too
Kids get high in the spare bedroom
We grow up and move away
The seasons pass, but the monsters stay

I felt my skin tingle.

I felt as if time was real, as if I could get it back, go back and fix what I did wrong in my life, to other people.

I felt like I could cry

Kids are sad, the sky is blue
There are monsters in the spare bedroom
Kids grow up, and move away
They closed the plant and the mall arcade
Kids are sad, their parents, too
Kids get high in the spare bedroom
We grow up and move away
The seasons pass, but the monsters stay
Kids are sad, the sky is blue
There are monsters in the spare bedroom
Kids grow up, and move away
They closed the plant and the mall arcade
Kids are sad, their parents, too
Kids get high in the spare bedroom
We grow up and move away
The seasons pass, but the monsters stay

The slowly increasing severity of the song made me even more panicked.

I listened to the ensamble of the West L.A. Children's Chrior as they probably didn't know the meaning of what they were singing about.

The children had stopped singing, but the song was harsh, and kept inching up on me.

But then suddently, it was calm; or at least that's what it was intended to be, I just broke out crying.

I missed my friends, my teachers, my normal life.

I wondered what the pourpose of this section is, it seemed out of place at the time.

Kids are sad, the sky is blue
There are monsters in the spare bedroom
Kids grow up, and move away
They closed the plant and the mall arcade
Kids are sad, their parents, too
Kids get high in the spare bedroom
We grow up and move away
The seasons pass, but the monsters stay
Kids are sad, the sky is blue
There are monsters in the spare bedroom
Kids grow up, and move away
They closed the plant and the mall arcade
Kids are sad, their parents, too
Kids get high in the spare bedroom
We grow up and move away
The seasons pass, but the monsters stay

I started singing the lyrics:

"Kids are sad, the sky is blue

"There are monsters in the spare bedroom

"Kids grow up, and move away

"They closed the plant and the mall arcade

"Kids are sad, their parents, too

"Kids get high in the spare bedroom

"We grow up and move away

"The seasons pass, but the monsters stay"

I started to stop crying. I hadn't gotten over what I was crying about, but I knew it was neccicary.

The song was about being pushed out of childhood unprepared, without wanting it, and so was my crying.

The music faded out.

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